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Posts Tagged ‘Page One Collective’

BK/NY – Tuesday, October 6th – Letter Writing To Kamau Sadiki

kamau

WHAT: Political Prisoner Letter-Writing
WHEN: 7pm, Tuesday, October 6th, 2020
WHERE: YOUR HOME
COST: Free

This week, as part of our every-other-week political prisoner letter-writing dinner, NYC ABC and Page One Collective will be writing to Kamau Sadiki, former Black Panther Party member and Black Liberation Army (BLA) soldier who is currently serving a life plus ten years sentence for the murder of an Atlanta cop in 1971. He was arrested and convicted over 30 years after the cop was killed based solely on the testimonies of former BLA comrades-turned-snitch that were not even present at the time of the action.

This should not come as a surprise as the State has never ended their war against Black people and continue to divisively target Black communities. An increased interest in what the State labels terrorism is what led to the increased interest of Kamau in 2002 when he was brought in for questioning on an unrelated matter. They were aware of his former relationship with the perennially Most Wanted Assata Shakur, with whom Kamau has a daughter. They attempted to extract information from him about Assata and tried to recruit him to lure her away from Cuba or else he “would die in prison.” When he refused to turn his back on his principles and his community, the state of Georgia vindictively moved forward with charges of the decades old crime.

Before Kamau’s time in the BLA, he was a New York City teenager who was deeply moved by the principles and organizing efforts of the Black Panther Party. At age 17 he joined up in Jamaica, Queens and volunteered in the Free Breakfast for Children program in the morning, hit the streets with BPP newsletters in the afternoon in an effort to organize his neighbors, and took part in political education classes at night. Once the FBI’s CoIntelPro was in full swing, decimating the Party and their ability to progress, Kamau and many others went underground to the more clandestine BLA for fear of being entrapped, framed, or murdered.

For more info on Kamau Sadiki, check out freekamau.com which gives an account of Kamau’s life from two former political prisoners, Safiya Bukhari and Claude Marks (freedomarchives.org).

Here is an excerpt of Kamau’s 2003 sentencing statement:
My joining the Black Panther Party and consequently the Black Liberation Army was a response to the oppressive climate that existed in America at the time. The struggle of people of color evolved out of the legacy of slavery and the subsequent Jim Crow laws of the reconstruction period. Following decades of oppression, people of color in this country recognized they had to negotiate their liberation through armed resistance and it was during this period of history that the Black Panther Party and the Black Liberation Army were major players.

Please take the time to write a letter to Kamau (and share a photo of your completed envelopes with us online):
Kamau Sadiki* #0001150688
Augusta State Medical Prison
3001 Gordon Highway
Grovetown, Georgia 30813
*Address envelope to Freddie Hilton

BK/NY – Tuesday, September 22nd – Letter Writing To Ed Poindexter

WHAT: Political Prisoner Letter-Writing
WHEN: 7pm, Tuesday, September 22nd, 2020
WHERE: YOUR HOME
COST: Free

Fires are raging across the country, some literal, some figurative. And the fallout from the latter is showing in ongoing repression by the state. Folks are being overcharged, having their living spaces raided, and collectively face hundreds of years in prison. For those who organize support for political prisoners, that work in the struggle is becoming even more crucial.

When reflecting on a heightened level of repression by the state and cooperators, it is impossible not to think of those imprisoned under similar, past historical conditions. So join NYC ABC and Page One Collective this week to write to Ed Poindexter, a Black Panther political prisoner in Nebraska. This simple and low-stakes ritual of regularly writing political prisoners is an excellent way to keep those who have fought the system and lost present in our minds, hearts, and communities.

Ed Poindexter and Mondo we Langa are commonly known as the “Omaha Two.” They were leaders of the Black Panther Party in Omaha in the late 1960s and, like others, were targeted both by the Omaha police and the FBI under its notorious COINTELPRO spying and disruption program.

In August 1970, the Two were framed on charges of killing an Omaha police officer, who died after being lured into a home where a suitcase bomb exploded. They were subsequently imprisoned. After a long illness, we Langa died in 2016 after 45 years in prison, while Ed Poindexter remains locked up. Currently, a campaign to secure clemency for Ed is underway and details are available at jerichony.org/events2.html

Please take the time to write a letter to Ed (and share a photo of your completed envelopes with us online):
Ed Poindexter #27767
Nebraska State Penitentiary
Post Office Box 22500
Lincoln, Nebraska 68542

BK/NY – Tuesday, September 8th – Letter Writing To Doug Wright and Skelly (Cleveland 4)

WHAT: Political Prisoner Letter-Writing
WHEN: 7pm, Tuesday, September 8th, 2020
WHERE: YOUR HOME
COST: Free

As the fight against police brutality rages on, we witness evidence of the centuries-long commitment the state and the non-uniformed white supremacists have to each other in this country. The murders in Kenosha following the life-altering shooting of Jacob Blake to the most recent death of Michael Reinoehl in Portland are emblematic of the tragedy that ensues when lines are drawn. The fight continues, and daily we are reminded that the state regularly cooperates with and relies on the contributions of the white supremacist, racist, fascist right wing to do their dirty work (if they aren’t willing to do it themselves).

Speaking of the state and cooperators, please join NYC ABC and Page One Collective this week to write the two folks from Cleveland still finishing their sentences after being entrapped by the FBI during Occupy Cleveland. This simple and low-stakes ritual of regularly writing political prisoners is an excellent way to keep those who have fought the system and lost present in our minds, hearts and communities as these battles in the streets rage on.

Douglas Wright and Joshua Stafford (aka “Skelly”) are two Occupy Cleveland activists. They were arrested on April 30th, 2012, days before national May Day protests. They were accused of plotting a series of bombings, including that of an area bridge. However, the real story is that FBI informants and undercover agents had a heavy hand in creating the alleged plot, produced the explosives, and coerced the four into participating. For more information, be sure to visit cleveland4solidarity.org

Please take the time to write a letter to Doug and Skelly (and share a photo of your completed envelopes with us online):
Skelly* #57976-060
USP McCreary
Post Office Box 3000
Pine Knot, Kentucky 42635

*Address envelope to Joshua Stafford.

Douglas Wright #57973-060
USP Victorville
Post Office Box 3900
Adelanto, California 92301

BK/NY – Tuesday, August 25th – Black August Letter Writing

WHAT: Political Prisoner Letter-Writing
WHEN: 7pm, Tuesday, August 25th, 2020
WHERE: YOUR HOME
COST: Free

Due to the pandemic and uprisings against white supremacist policing (redundant, we know), many of us are too overwhelmed to even notice the full-blown war being waged by cops and the ruling class. It is real and it is continuing. And of course there is another war—the war against folks imprisoned for their political beliefs and actions. And here’s where we bridge the two. Nearing the end of Black August, NYC ABC and Page One Collective will be sending letters to Black revolutionary political prisoners and there’s an easy (too easy? POSSIBLY!) way for you to help, just by writing from home. Please post a photo of your addressed envelope on social media and tag us (with your return address blurred out) and we will share it. Use Page One’s recent zine, “Current Political Prisoners of Black Liberation Movements,” for up-to-date addresses.

Tuesday, August 11th – Letter-writing to Jaan Laaman

WHAT: Political Prisoner Letter-Writing
WHEN: 7pm, Tuesday, August 11th, 2020
WHERE: YOUR HOME

COST: Free
jaan laaman 2015
Hot on the heels of our formal announcement regarding Running Down the Walls 2020, NYC ABC is back with another letter-writing event. Again collaborating with Page One Collective, and still encouraging folks to write from home as we navigate the continued threat of the novel coronavirus, focusing on anti-imperialist political prisoner Jaan Laaman. It is impossible to think about Jaan without thinking of his United Freedom Front co-defendant Tom Manning, who died in prison at the hands of medical neglect and state tyranny. Your spirit lives with us, Tom!

Jaan Laaman is imprisoned for actions carried out by United Freedom Front (UFF). The UFF was a clandestine revolutionary organization active in the United States in the early 1980s. The group targeted government institutions and major corporations that had ties to the South African Apartheid system or right-wing paramilitaries in Central America. This included taking actions directly against the South African and United States governments. The UFF carried out targeted bombings of corporate buildings, courthouses and military facilities as well as bank robberies to fund revolutionary projects, while insuring that those buildings were empty when targeted. Prior to his role in the UFF, Jaan was deeply involved in anti-South African apartheid organizing.

Please take the time to write a letter to Jaan (and share a photo of your completed envelopes with us online):
Jaan Karl Laaman #10372-016
USP McCreary
Post Office Box 3000
Pine Knot, Kentucky 42635

 

 

Tuesday, July 14th – Letter-writing to Xinachtli

WHAT: Political Prisoner Letter-Writing
WHEN: 7pm, Tuesday, July 14th, 2020
WHERE: YOUR HOME

COST: Free
alvaro luna hernandez xinachtli 2020_FBAs efforts build to coordinate support for those arrested and facing repression as a result of the uprising against cops killing Black folks (and policing in general), the state is using federal grand juries and sending agents to knock on doors in hopes of gathering evidence. Locals cops and overzealous bootlicking reactionaries have murdered protestors in an attempt to directly stop them and intimidate others. And of course the state is using this moment in history to further punish those already imprisoned—with lockdowns, transfers, neglect, and outright brutality. One way to support those in prison is through the simple act of writing a letter. This week NYC ABC, in collaboration with Page One Collective, are encouraging you to write to Chicano political prisoner Xinachtli.

Xinachtli, fka Alvaro Luna Hernández, is a Chicano-Mexicano political prisoner sentenced to 50 years in prison for aggravated assault on a cop when he disarmed a sheriff attempting to shoot him.

Deeply effected by witnessing the murder of one of his friends by a known racist cop (yes, it’s redundant), Xinachtli dedicated his life to fighting police brutality, especially as it was manifest against the Chicano community. From 1976 through 1990, Xinachtli was falsely accused of murder (and after public outcry eventually released) and severely beaten by police, all the result of his work to end police brutality in Houston, Texas.

In 1996, some corny county sheriff came to Xinachtli’s house, allegedly to arrest him for robbery (side note: the robbery charge was summarily dismissed). The cop didn’t have an arrest warrant and when Xinachtli, unarmed, questioned the cop’s abuse of power, the cop pulled his gun. Before he could shoot, Xinachtli disarmed the cop without injuring him, and fled.

Upon his capture, Xinachtli was found guilty and sentenced to an unbelievable 50 years in prison. Since his imprisonment, he has been denied access to library materials, faced increasing censorship of his mail, and had to deal with retaliation from prison staff over his filing of grievances.

Most recently, the state is subjecting Xinachtli to a campaign of harassment and repeated discriminatory cellblock assignments, although he has violated no prison rule.

Please take the time to write a letter to Xinachtli (and share a photo of your completed envelopes with us online):
Xinachtli* #255735
James V Allred Unit
2101 FM 369 North
Iowa Park, Texas 76367
*Address envelopes to Alvaro Luna Hernández, cards/letters to Xinachtli.

Tuesday, June 16th – Letter-writing to Imam Jamil al-Amin

WHAT: Political Prisoner Letter-Writing
WHEN: 7pm, Tuesday, June 16th, 2020
WHERE: YOUR HOME

COST: Free
from h. rap to imam jamilTo say it’s heating up in NYC is an understatement, and we don’t mean the late spring heatwave. Folks in their neighborhoods have been rising up against the fundamentally white supremacist NYPD. In NYC ABC, we organized a noise demonstration outside MDC Brooklyn, where prison cops killed Jamel Floyd and continue our work to support U.S. held political prisoners and prisoners of war. Though we remain quarantined from our in-person communities, the work continues, again in collaboration with our comrades in Page One Collective. Therefore, instead of coming together at The Base in Brooklyn, we ask that folks participate in keeping prisoners from being more alienated than they already are, by writing from home. Please post a photo of your addressed envelope on social media and tag us (with your return address blurred out) and we will share it, building digital community while our analog community stays indoors and washes its hands. This week, our every-other-week letter-writing is focused on Black liberation political prisoner Imam Jamil Al-Amin.

We were recently reminded of the quote ‘violence is as American as cherry pie’ with the choking murder of George Floyd in Minneapolis by cops there. That prescient quote is from Imam Jamil Al-Amin (then known as H. Rap Brown).

Jamil Al-Amin is a long time community leader and organizer, falsely imprisoned for  killing a sheriff’s deputy in Georgia. He was convicted in 2002 and after some time in Georgia state prison, the state decided to bury him in federal custody at the notorious Florence Supermax in Colorado. Due to a concerted and strong effort on the part of his supporters, Imam Jamil was transferred to the medical facility at Butner after having been diagnosed with bone cancer. Family and supporters are currently pushing for an appeal to his trial. More information is available at whathappened2rap.com

Please take the time to write a letter to Jamil (and share a photo of your completed envelopes with us online):
Jamil Abdullah Al-Amin #99974-555
USP Tucson
Post Office Box 24550
Tucson, Arizona 85734

Tuesday, June 2nd – Letter Writing for Marius Mason

WHAT: Political Prisoner Letter-Writing
WHEN: 7pm, Tuesday, June 2nd, 2020
WHERE: YOUR HOME

COST: Free
marius 2020_1
Are there things worth dying for? For going out into the world, mid-pandemic, and risking infection for? Of course there are! But going back to work early to please a boss or pushing folks into work to salvage a crumbling capitalism aren’t two of them. Standing up to systems of oppression in the face of murderous cops is worth it and over the last week, we’ve seen brave folks get together to say cops won’t murder Black folks with no response. The state’s reaction will likely be harsh, the punishments draconian, and still folks rise up. In NYC ABC, we focus work on those living under repression in prison for actions taken in the ongoing quest for justice. Although we remain quarantined from our in-person communities, the work continues. Therefore, instead of coming together at The Base in Brooklyn, we ask that folks participate in keeping prisoners from being more alienated than they already are, by writing from home. Please post a photo of your addressed envelope on social media and tag us (with your return address blurred out) and we will share it, building digital community while our analog community stays indoors and washes its hands. This week, collaborating with comrades from Page One Collective, in an early reply to the call for June 11 actions, we focus our every-other-week letter-writing on eco-anarchist political prisoner Marius Mason.

Marius Mason is an anarchist, environmental, and animal rights prisoner. In March 2008, he was arrested by federal authorities for charges related to two acts of property destruction that occurred in 1999 and 2000 – damaging an office connected to GMO (Genetically Modified Organism) research, and destroying a piece of logging equipment. No one was injured in either act. He faced a life sentence before accepting a plea bargain in September 2008.

Mason was sentenced on February 5, 2009 in federal court in Lansing, Michigan. He received almost 22 years – the longest sentence of any Green Scare prisoner. An appeal for a reduction in his sentence was denied in 2010.

Marius was quarantined starting April 25, when he tested positive for the corona virus. Marius has underlying factors that make him vulnerable to COVID 19, and legal options are being pursued, thanks to his attorney. More information at supportmariusmason.org

Please take the time to write a letter to Marius (and share a photo of your completed envelopes with us online):
Marie (Marius) Mason #04672-061
FCI Danbury
Route 37
Danbury, Connecticut 06811

Tuesday, May 19th – Letter Writing for Jeremy Hammond & Eric King

WHAT: Political Prisoner Letter-Writing
WHEN: 7pm, Tuesday, May 19th, 2020
WHERE: YOUR HOME

COST: Free
eric king_jeremy hammond_FBAs COVID 19 continues to rear its ugly head and capitalism continues to exploit vulnerable communities made even more vulnerable in the wake of the pandemic, we have no choice but to continue our work as well. Although we remain quarantined from our in-person communities, our friends behind the walls are experiencing a level of isolation and danger to which our chosen social isolation cannot compare. Therefore, instead of coming together at The Base in Brooklyn, we at Page One Collective are (virtually) joining our friends at NYC ABC to maintain some semblance of a bi-weekly letter-writing tradition. We ask that folks participate as well, so we can do our best to keep prisoners from being more alienated than they already are, by writing from home. Please post a photo of your addressed envelope on social media and tag us (with your return address blurred out) and we will share it, building digital community while our analog community stays indoors and washes its hands.

This week we are focusing on two anarchist folks who have both had particularly rough years, even by the standard of the hell that is prison. Please join us in sending them some much needed love and support as they navigate their respective situations amidst the pandemic.

Jeremy Hammond is an anarchist computer hacker from Chicago. In November 2013, he was sentenced to 10 years in federal prison for leaking the personal information of 860,000 customers of private intelligence firm Strategic Forecasting (Stratfor) through the whistle-blowing website Wikileaks. This information revealed that Stratfor spies on activists, among others, at the behest of corporations and the U.S. government. In early September 2019, Jeremy was transferred to Virginia and called against his will to appear before a grand jury. He was jailed at the same spot as Chelsea Manning, who was also being held for grand jury resistance, until March 12, 2020. Because of COVID, he is now stuck at Grady County Jail awaiting transfer back to a federal facility to resume his original sentence. For more information visit freejeremy.net.

In May 2019 Eric King was indicted by a grand jury in the District Court of Colorado for a new federal felony charge of Assaulting a Federal Official. This charge is based on what the government says happened during the interview in the Florence storage room with a Lieutenant. Eric now faces up to 20 additional years in federal prison and is fighting this charge while still in the custody of his accusers. Eric is pre-trial, do not mention his current charges.

Eric is a vegan anarchist prisoner serving a 10 year sentence for an attempted firebombing of a government official’s office in Kansas City, Missouri in September 2014. Eric was charged with throwing a hammer through a window of the building, followed by two lit Molotov cocktails. The criminal complaint states that both incendiary devices failed to ignite. We encourage folks to send him a card or letter and spread the word about him if not already doing so. More information can be found at supportericking.org.

Please take the time to write a letter to Jeremy and Eric (and share a photo of your completed envelopes with us online):
Jeremy Hammond #151960859
Grady County Jail
215 North 3rd Street
Chickasha, Oklahoma 73018

Eric King #27090-045
FCI Englewood
9595 West Quincy Avenue
Littleton, Colorado 80123

Tuesday, May 5th – Letter Writing for Sundiata Acoli & Dr. Mutulu Shakur

WHAT: Political Prisoner Letter-Writing
WHEN: 7pm, Tuesday, May 5th, 2020
WHERE: YOUR HOME

COST: Free

 


Normally around this time of year, NYC ABC would be printing May Day cards for our every-other-week political prisoner letter-writing dinners. Clearly, times have changed.  We are also excited to be collaboratively organizing letter-writing nights with Page One Collective. And while the events will be collaboratively organized, instead of coming together at The Base in Brooklyn, we are asking folks to keep letter-writing on your minds and keep prisoners from being more alienated than they already are by writing from home. Please post a photo of your addressed envelope on social media and tag us (with your return address blurred out) and we will share it, building digital community while our analog community stays indoors and washes its hands. This week we turn our focus to Sundiata Acoli and Dr. Mutulu Shakur, Black Panther Party members serving time for charges connected to Assata Shakur and/or her successful 1979 prison break and escape.

A New York Black Panther, Sundiata Acoli endured two years of prison awaiting trial for the Panther 21 Conspiracy Case. He and his comrades were eventually acquitted on all the bogus charges. The case was historic and a classic example of police and government attempting to neutralize organizations by incarcerating their leadership. As a result of this political attack and because of the immense pressure and surveillance from the FBI and local police Sundiata, like many other Panther leaders went “underground.”  On May 2, 1973, Sundiata Acoli, Assata Shakur and Zayd Shakur were ambushed and attacked by state troopers on the New Jersey Turnpike. Assata was wounded and Zayd was killed. During the gun battle a state trooper was shot and killed in self defense. Sundiata was tried in an environment of mass hysteria and convicted, although there was no credible evidence that he killed the trooper or had been involved in the shooting. He was sentenced to thirty years. Sundiata was ordered released on parole by a state appeals court in New Jersey in September 2014 when the court ruled the parole board had “acted arbitrarily and capriciously” when it previously denied him parole. The State of New Jersey appealed the decision and won. More information: sundiataacoli.org

In 1987 Dr. Mutulu Shakur was sentenced to 60 years imprisonment for his role in the Black Liberation Movement. In March 1982, Dr. Shakur and 10 others were indicted by a federal grand jury under a set of U.S. conspiracy laws called Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organization (RICO) laws. These conspiracy laws were ostensibly developed to aid the government in its prosecution of organized crime figures; however, they have been used with varying degrees of success against revolutionary organizations. Dr. Shakur was charged with conspiracy and participation in the Black Liberation Army, a group that carried out actual and attempted expropriations from several banks. Eight incidents were alleged to have occurred between December 1976 to October 1981. In addition, he was charged with participation in the 1979 prison escape of Assata Shakur, who is now in exile in Cuba. After five years underground, Dr. Shakur was arrested on February 12, 1986. While he was on the street, Dr. Shakur challenged the use of methadone as a tool of recovery for addicts. He believed in natural remedies instead and, based on those beliefs, founded the Black Acupuncture Advisory Association of North America. Many people credit Shakur with saving their lives. Dr. Shakur has worked to free political prisoners and to expose government abuses against political organizers. While in prison, he has struggled to create peace between rival gangs. More information: mutulushakur.com

Please take the time to write a letter to Sundiata and Mutulu (and share a photo of your completed envelopes with us online):
Sundiata Acoli* #39794-066
FCI Cumberland
Federal Correctional Institution
Post Office Box 1000
Cumberland, Maryland 21501
*Address envelope to Clark Squire

Dr. Mutulu Shakur #83205-012
FMC Lexington
Post Office Box 14500
Lexington, Kentucky 40512