Home > What We Do > Tuesday, February 22nd – Letter Writing To Ronald Reed

Tuesday, February 22nd – Letter Writing To Ronald Reed

21 February 2022

WHAT: Political Prisoner Letter-Writing
WHEN: 7pm, Tuesday, February 22nd, 2022
WHERE: YOUR HOME
COST: Free

So this post was going to start off with a clever twist on the usual call for active inter-generational and intersectional solidarity as the only hope at this point for those who want anything other than outright fascism. But in light of the vigilante shooting of multiple comrades the other night in Portland, our clever arguments don’t seem apt. The ongoing collusion of state and right-wing violence directed at Black and Brown people, anti-racist protestors, and those perceived as being anarchist or anti-fascist, is chillingly horrific. The old familiar adage “we keep us safe” is as true as ever, because if we don’t, it is increasingly clear that truly no one will. But that “we” is open-ended, an invitation more than a definition. The more bridges we can build and maintain with any and all people struggling for a society based on solidarity rather than white supremacist, heterosexist domination, the stronger and safer we will all be.

One great way to build those bridges is to write letters to political prisoners! Engage with them, have a respectful dialogue; we all have things to learn from and teach each other. lf they don’t have the capacity to respond, be understanding, stay in the loop, offer your help to their public support crews, learn about the context of their cases, and spread the word. You can start this week, by joining NYC ABC and Page One Collective in writing to Black liberation struggle political prisoner Ronald Reed.

Ronald Reed is a former 60s civil rights activist. In 1969, Reed was also among the students at St. Paul Central High School who demanded black history courses and organized actions against racist teachers. He was also instrumental in helping to integrate college campuses in Minnesota. During this period, Reed began to look toward revolutionary theory and began to engage in political street theater with other young black revolutionaries in the city of St. Paul.

Reed went on to join the Black United Front. In 1970 he was convicted of shooting a St. Paul police officer. Twenty-five years after the killing, Reed was arrested and convicted of first-degree murder and conspiracy to commit first degree-murder. He is serving life in prison.

Please take the time to write a letter to Ronald:
Ronald Reed #219531
Minnesota Correctional Facility-Lino Lakes
7525 Fourth Avenue
Lino Lakes, Minnesota 55014

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